cold weather tea warmth

tea party- A Group of Artists

tea party- A Group of Artists

“Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast,

Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round,

And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn

Throws up a steamy column, and the cups,

That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each,

So let us welcome peaceful evening in.”

William Cowper, The Task (1785), Book IV, line 36.

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New to The Tea Catcher Quiver

“A man without tea in him is incapable of understanding truth and beauty.”

Okakura Kakuzo, The Book of Tea (1906)

Gaiwan and tasting cup

Tasting cup and Gaiwan

One of a new pair of Japanese Gaiwan; great for making Green, White and Oolong Teas.

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

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Afternoon Tea

genie pot

fantastic new gift for the tea catcher quiver….hopefully when rubbed, the genie that arrives cleans the windows in the background of the tea lab….!

“…meanwhile let us have a cup of tea. The afternoon glow is brightening the bamboos, the fountains are bubbling with delight, the soughing(sighing?) of the pines is heard in our kettle. Let us dream of evanescence and linger in the beautiful foolishness of things.” Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea,[wiki]1906

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

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Teaism

Teaism

Tea ceremony

japanese tea ceremony

“When tea is more than a drink and the tea ceremony is understood and practiced to foster harmony in humanity, promote harmony with nature, discipline the mind, quiet the heart, and attain the purity of enlightenment, the art of tea becomes teaism.

The term “chadao” has two words, the first being ‘tea’ and the second the Chinese loanword tao/dao/ native suffix -ism (also Japanese: 主義), and could thus be read as ‘teaism’. Another, more literal reading of the word is the ‘way of tea’ (茶 tea and 道 way), comparable with for example 弓道; the way of the bow. The term can be used to describe tea ceremony as the interests in tea culture and studies and pursued over time with self-cultivation.

Teaism is mostly a simplistic mode of aesthetics, but there are subtle insights into ethics, and even metaphysics. Teaism is related to teamind. A sense of focus and concentration while under the influence of great tasting tea.

A Teaist is a person who performs or enjoys the art of tea and teaism. In Chinese and Japanese, as well as South Korean traditional culture, there are well developed teaisms.” [wiki- tea lore]

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

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Tea Labeling Nomenclature

tea leaves 1

SFTGFOP

S-super
SFTGFOP(1)—sometimes used to indicate the very finest

F-finest
Finest TGF OP—highest quality grade (Note: “Special” is occasionally substituted for “Finest”, with a number 1 at the end to indicate the very finest), often hand processed and produced at only the best plantations, roughly one quarter tips.

T-tippy
Tippy Golden F OP—the highest proportion of tip, main grade in Darjeeling and Assam

G-golden
F-flowery
Golden Flowery: includes very young tips or buds (usually golden in colour) that were picked early in the season.

O-orange

• Color: The copper color of a high-quality, oxidized leaf before drying, or the final bright orange color of the dried pekoes in the finished tea may be related to the name. These usually consist of one leaf bud and two leaves covered in fine, downy hair. The orange color is produced when the tea is fully oxidized.)
• (The Dutch House of Orange-Nassau, now the royal family, was already the most respected aristocratic family in the days of the Dutch Republic, and came to control the de facto head of state position of Stadtholder of Holland and Zealand. The Dutch East India Company performed a central role in bringing tea to Europe and may have marketed the tea as “orange” to suggest association with the House of Orange.)

P-pekoe
(The origin of the word “pekoe” is uncertain. One explanation is it is derived from the transliterated mispronunciation of the Amoy (Xiamen) dialect word for a Chinese tea known as “white down/hair” (白毫; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pe̍h-ho). This is how “pekoe” is listed by Rev. Robert Morrison (1782–1834) in his Chinese dictionary (1819) as one of the seven sorts of black tea “commonly known by Europeans”. This refers to the down-like white “hairs” on the leaf and also to the youngest leaf buds. Another hypothesis is that the term derives from the Chinese báihuā “white flower” (Chinese: 白花; pinyin: báihuā; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pe̍h-hoe), and refers to the bud content of pekoe tea.)

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

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